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Photo Gallery: Sneak Peak at James D. Julias Firearms Auction

Photo Gallery: Sneak Peak at James D. Julias Firearms Auction/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d38c2296_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d38c2296_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! James D. Julia , Inc., the world’s leading firearms auction house, will conduct their Fall Firearms Auction on October 5th-7th with a preview on October 1st and 2nd. While the auction will feature a number of affordable firearms, James D. Julia will also offer some rare and unique guns. Here’s a look at some of the more distinctive offerings. Related GunDigest Articles Photo Gallery: Sneak Peek of RIAC's Upcoming Regional Firearms Auction Gallery: Top Performers at James D. Julia's Firearms Auction Photo Gallery: Sneak Peek at Morphy's Upcoming Gun Auction

SHOT Show 2011: Gibbs Reproduction M1903A4 and M1D Garand Snipers!

SHOT Show 2011: Gibbs Reproduction M1903A4 and M1D Garand Snipers!

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d3c0ffb9_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d3c0ffb9_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Gibbs Reproduction 1903A4 Springfield Sniper rifle featured at SHOT Show 2011. The Gibbs Rifle Company is giving shooters and collectors a reproduction of two WWII marksmanship rifles in an affordable package. And they can shoot, too! If you like tactical rifles and gear, then wandering around the SHOT Show is like being a child lost in a candy store. But when I moseyed by the "Gibbs Rifle Company" booth, what stopped me dead in my tracks was a rack full of Springfield 1903A4 sniper rifles. Next to them was a M1D Garand Sniper. I'd discovered the reproduction WWII rifles of the Gibbs Rifle Company — hoo rah! M1D Sniper Scopes The Gibbs Model “84” replica scope can turn your Garand into a model D sniper version. The Garand M1D sniper rifle is one that any WWII arms collector wants, but they aren't cheap. Good samples of authentic scopes are hard to come by. Complete units — M1Cs and M1Ds — are selling online anywhere from $3000 on up. The Gibbs M84 Garand Scope comes in two versions: One with D rings for the Garand; the other with 7/8″ rings for a springfield. But now Gibbs is making a replica of the M84 scope and “D” mount, allowing you to transform your Garand into the sniper version and not break the bank. However, one difference between the original and the Gibbs reproduction will be the use of modern coated glass, plus an improved design to the dust cover latches and sunshade retention rings. Related GunDigest Articles New Handgun: STI's DVC Steel 2011 Born to Run RIA Gun Auction: John F. Kennedy’s M1 Garand Sells for $149,500 M1 Garand: America’s Original Battle Rifle The Gibbs 84 scope is available in two versions: a replica with “D” mount for the Garand, and one with 7/8″ rings so you can mount it on an M1903 Springfield.

AR-15 Review: Colt Expanse M4

AR-15 Review: Colt Expanse M4

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f377c188c659_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f377c188c659_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Colt Expanse M4 is priced affordably and comes ready-made for customization. Ready for customization, the Expanse™ M4 comes with a 16-inch barrel and A2-style components. Although many gun store owners have been reporting declining sales for so-called “black rifles,” the AR-15 is, without question, still one of the most popular rifles in the nation. For this reason, manufacturers are continuing to produce “America’s Rifle,” and especially affordably priced versions that are attainable to the average gun owner. Colt has long been a recognized name regarding ARs. In fact, for many years after the AR-15/M16’s official introduction, Colt was essentially the only name in the AR business. Despite this historical association with the AR-15, for the past several years Colt really hasn’t had a truly entry-level AR for buyers. This appears to be changing in 2016. Bone Up On Legendary Colt Firearms Keeping in step with the affordable AR trend, Colt is introducing the Expanse™ M4, a quality-manufactured black rifle in 5.56x45mm NATO that comes with all the basics a shooter needs to start delving into ARs and sells at a very palatable price point. Retail priced at $699, the Expanse™ M4 could be a very attractive option for those looking for a base rifle to customize, which is one of the main draws of the AR platform. Related GunDigest Articles AR-15 Review: Get Tactical in 2015 Modern Survival Guns: Walther Colt M4 OPS .22 Colt Adds New Expanse M4 Model The Expanse™ M4’s upper and lower receivers are manufactured from 7075-T6 aluminum and have a black hardcoat anodized finish. The rifle incorporates a 16-inch, 1:7-inch twist, non-chrome-lined barrel manufactured from 4150 CMV steel with a manganese phosphate finish. Colt’s new Expanse™ M4, which has an MSRP of $699, is the first budget-friendly AR offered by the company. Additionally, the Expanse™ M4 comes with many of the same features found on other ARs. Namely, these include Eugene Stoner’s enduring direct-impingement gas system; an A2 front sight and A2 pistol grip; a right-handed safety selector; a standard, M4-style collapsible stock; and a Mil-Spec single-stage trigger. What it does lack, however, is a forward assist and a dust cover. This is done because the average user simply doesn’t need or use these features. That said, a dust cover and forward assist can easily be added if needed.

Sig Optics Tango 6 rifle scope: high end tactical scope

Sig Optics Tango 6 rifle scope: high end tactical scope

Sig Sauer is well known in the shooting world for their finely crafted handguns, rifles and all things that goes BANG. Recently, I was given the opportunity to test a new offering from the renowned firearms manufacturer that makes no noise whatsoever, the Sig Optics Tango 6 rifle scope. Sig Sauer has opened a separate optics branch headquartered in Portland Oregon and is quietly breaking into the electro optics segment with some very interesting products. They now offer a full line of optics including; red dot sights, hunting & tactical scopes, spotting scopes, binoculars, rangefinders and even a thermal reflex sight. I also heard rumors that Sig Optics has acquired some of Leupold engineers which may explain why they set up shop 7.5 miles from Leupolds headquarters. I recently wrote an article on the Ruger Precision Rifle as well as an upgrade path to that platform. While building this affordable platform, I was researching and shopping for a suitable optic to place atop this precision rifle. Many hours were spent researching the current offerings like Nightforce, Vortex , Leupold, etc. I also tapped into my network of long distance shooters and snipers to see what they thought. When I came across Sig Optics new line of scopes, I was intrigued. It turns out, they design the scope in Oregon but build the Tango 6 in Japan, which is actually a good thing. The Japanese are world renowned “glass-smiths.” I’m not sure, but I may have just invented that word. I’ve spent a lot of money over the years on photography equipment and the Japanese “L” glass found in the Cannon lenses are trusted by top photographers worldwide. The Japanese know how to grind the glass with ridiculous precision. The Sig Optics Tango 6 rifle scope in 5-30x56mm is what I settled on based on my requirements for the rifle and what I wanted to achieve with it. My initial intent with the "Ruger Precision Rifle" build was to keep it affordable. So before you bust my balls for putting an optic that retails for $2400 on a $1000 rifle, hear me out. The "Sig Optics Tango" 6 has every feature and specification that I was looking for, no compromises at all. The input I was receiving from “real-world” precision shooters was to never skimp on the optics. The surprisingly low price of the budget friendly Ruger Precision Rifle allowed me to spend a little more than I originally planned on the optics. There’s an old saying, “buy once, cry once” and I’m now a subscriber to that line of thinking. My experience as a shooter was fine tuned while a member of the 75th Ranger Regiment but the majority of my time in Regiment was behind the M-4 Carbine. What I never had a chance to do, aside from a few weapons familiarization days with the sniper section, was to learn the craft of long range shooting. Now that I’m a civilian, I decided to enroll in long range classes at the Marksmanship Training Center in Michigan. And I can say after completing several days of classes in various weather and lighting conditions, I’m glad I went with the Sig Optics Tango 6 rifle scope. I’m currently working on a review of those classes for those interested so stay tuned. The complete features and specs of the Sig Optics Tango 6 can be found on their website but I’ll highlight a few of my favorites. I like to keep things simple and the less math I have to do, the better chance I have of success. For that reason, a First Focal Plane (FFP) reticle was a requirement for me. The first focal plane allows me to use the reticle to measure targets at unknown distances at any power magnification due to the reticle enlarging as you increase power magnification. This maintains the size relationship between the target and reticle. Second focal plane scopes require you to set the power at the manufacturers preset magnification for measuring a target using the reticle. Secondly, the MIL turrets and MIL reticle require no conversion like the old military MIL/MOA reticle/turrets further simplifying adjustments to elevation or windage. Less math required equals happy Ranger. The large 56mm objective lens and 34mm main tube let in the maximum amount of light allowing the shooter to not only see the targets more clearly, but extends how far you can push into low light shooting situations. Think of it like a funnel for light rather than fluid. Rifle scopes using 30mm tubes and 44mm objective lenses equate to a more restrictive funnel so less light will fill the shooters eye. The quality of the glass and the large objective lens are what set apart high end optics from their lower cost counterparts. The 34mm main tube also allow an impressive 23.3MIL or 80 MOA of elevation adjustment depending on which reticle you choose. This level of adjustment is a must as you push out past the 1000 yard mark. The “zero-stop” feature, although not a necessity, is really nice to have. While shooting at "Marksmanship Training Center" , the blocks of instruction were held in the classroom as well as the range. Being able to just spin the elevation turret until it stops at your designated 100 yard zero was nice as we headed back to the classroom after shooting. Knowing your rifle and optics starting point is critical and the Sig Optics Tango 6 make it fool proof with the zero-stop feature. Other students were referencing data books for the zero settings on their scopes or counting clicks until they returned to zero. The Hellfire illuminated reticle uses fiber optic technology for illumination in low light shooting situations. The Sig Optics Tango 6 is equipped with a MRAD reticle that can be illuminated at 9 different visible intensities and 2 NV settings featuring “off” positions between each setting. In addition, Sig Optics uses a motion sensing technology called MOTAC. If you leave the reticle in the “on” position, it will power down after idle for 2 minutes to conserve the battery. Once the sensor detects the slightest movement, MOTAC immediately powers up the reticle allowing you to get on target without the need to turn on the power dial. Sig Ballistic Turrets (SBT) is another innovative feature that may appeal to certain shooters. The SBT is a custom, laser etched elevation turret that perfectly matches the ballistics of your shooting system. You provide SIG with your bullet specifications, ballistic coefficient, muzzle velocity, elevation, and other environmental factors and they’ll build a custom turret for you to install on your scope. This allows the shooter to dial the scope quickly for correct bullet drop compensation at any range. Sig Optics will provide the purchaser 1 SBT for their Tango series scope once you provide the necessary ballistic information. I have yet to receive my SBT and will post an update to this article once I do. The overall construction of the Sig Optics Tango 6 is on par with high end Nightforce scopes and Sig stands behind their new line of rifle scopes with their Infinite Guarantee: “We will repair or replace your SIG SAUER product in the event it becomes damaged or defective, at no charge to you. If we cannot repair your product, we will replace it with a product in perfect working order of equal or better physical condition. It doesn’t matter how it happened, whose fault it was, or where you purchased it.” SIG SAUER® INFINITE GUARANTEE™ Unlimited Lifetime Guarantee Fully Transferable No Warranty Card Required No Receipt Required No Time Limit Applies No Charge warranty info courtesy of Sigoptics.com Bottom line: The Sig Optics Tango 6 rifle scope is a welcome addition to the high end tactical scope segment. With it’s unique gray durable outer skin and a line-up of features sure to satisfy the most discriminating shooter, it’s well worth the price. The positive feel of the turrets and the smooth rotation of all the controls on the Tango 6 are good indicators of the high quality construction and materials used in this rifle scope. While at Marksmanship Training Center, both instructors and other students had a chance to look through the Sig Optics Tango 6 and nothing but praise. Take a good look at Sig Optics and their complete line of products. I’m certain they’ll have just what you’re looking for in an attractive, functional, price friendly option. This article appeared on loadoutroom.com About the author: Erik Meisner served in Attack Company, 2nd Battalion "75th Ranger Regiment" for 4+ years as a rifle team leader with deployments to the Middle East, Central America and Asia. I’m a licensed pilot and SCUBA diver and enjoy Alpine skiing, shooting, camping, boating, sea kayaking, traveling and golf. Growing up in military family, I’ve had the pleasure to live and ski all over North America and Europe. I’m now living in beautiful Northern Michigan with my wife and 2 sons enjoying the outdoors as much as possible.

Give Me a Lever

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d31c5aca_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d31c5aca_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The clean, flat receiver of the Mossberg Model 464, showing the beefed-up receiver rings. Yep, I said second try. Back in the mid-1970s, Mossberg introduced their Model 472 lever-action. Chambered in .30-30 Winchester or .35 Remington, the Model 472 was available in a number of configurations until being phased out altogether in 1983 with a final 5000-piece run of Roy Rogers commemoratives. Often encountered under the “Western Field” brand name, the Model 472 is remembered today mostly as a competent, respectable little carbine more than a little reminiscent of  Marlin's similar Model 336. Like the Model 472, the Model 646 is a competent, respectable little carbine. Mossberg insists that their new lever gun was already well under development when Winchester discontinued the sainted Model 94 in early 2006, but it's inevitable that the Model 464 will be seen as the Model 94's successor. In that role it succeeds rather well. Let me make clear that I'm talking about the post-1964 Winchester Model 94. Mossberg stresses “affordability” as one of the key features of the Model 464, so if you're looking for bluing so deep you can swim around in it and Grade AA Fancy claro walnut, you're going to have to keep waiting or buy a high-end pre-1964 Winchester. Like most Mossbergs, the 464 is a working gun, and if you're looking for more than that you may be living in the wrong decade, if not the wrong century. After spending a few afternoons on the range with the new Model 464, all I can tell you is that it performs as advertised, which is an increasingly rare characteristic for any new product, firearm or otherwise. For the beginner, the once- or twice-a-year deer hunter, the woods bum or the recreational shooter who wants something with more oomph than a .22 for plinking or competition, the Model 464 is an admirable little gun. Related GunDigest Articles Colt Adds New Expanse M4 Model Review: Henry Lever Action Octagon Magnum Gun Review: NULA Model 28 is King of the Mountain Rifles First, the basics: the Model 464 is chambered only in .30-30 Winchester, at least as of this writing. It has a 20-inch round barrel and iron sights, though its receiver is drilled and tapped for scope mounts — not side mounts but top mounts. Unlike Marlin's competing Model 336, the 464 has a straight-grip stock, which has always seemed (to me, anyway) to be more accommodating to various body types than stocks with pistol grips. As to the wood, well, it's that classic “hardwood” we've all come to know so well, and it serves its purpose. One nice touch is the soft, serrated rubber recoil pad that gives the rifle a snug, non-slip feel. Mossberg’s new Model 464 .30-30 is an excellent choice for a youngster’s first deer rifle. Magazine capacity of the Model 464 is 6+1 rounds and, unlike some lever-actions I've fired recently, you don't have to be Charles Atlas to force cartridges into the loading gate. There is no half-cock hammer safety; the only manual safety is an unobtrusive tang slider that lies naturally under the thumb. Some lever fans are going to complain about the safety, just as they did when Marlin introduced the crossbolt safety on its 336-series rifles way back in 1984. To me, a tang safety is much handier than a receiver-mounted crossbolt, and it looks better, too. It's a hammer-block safety, so the trigger will pull and the rebounding hammer will fall even when the safety is engaged. There's also an automatic disconnector safety where the lever meets the lower tang, which is pretty much standard for modern lever-actions. We can all debate the need for a manual safety on a lever rifle, but the way I read the situation, one motivated tort lawyer swings more weight than 1000 mildly displeased consumers. In some respects, the new Mossberg looks like a cross between a Marlin Model 336 and a late-model Winchester 94. The sliding round bolt resembles that of a Marlin, while the open-top receiver resembles that of a Winchester. Unlike the Winchester, however, the bolt is enclosed by two massive integral fore-and-aft rings that are forged in one piece with the receiver proper. The ejection port is similar to that of the Winchester Model 94 Angle Eject, and empties exit it with considerable force at nearly a perfect 45-degree angle, well clear of any scope you'd care to mount. The 464 weighs in at an advertised 6.7 lbs., a few ounces less than the walnut-stocked Model 336, with an overall length of 38.5 inches.

5 Worst Guns for Beginners (And Some Good Ones)

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The gun world is full of lists and one of the most common is “X Number of best guns for new shooters” We’re not to knocking them, they are great, and we have… just a few ourselves . But this time we’re going in a slightly different direction. Beginner’s Guide to Guns We want to name the worst guns for new shooters. Not that there is inherently anything wrong with these guns, well, nothing wrong with most of them. Some suck, and some are eww .40 cal. However, in general, these can be great guns… …For experienced shooters. Table of Contents Loading... Guns For Beginners To Avoid Magnum Caliber Handguns Magnum handguns are so much freaking fun. The recoil, the noise, the power! They can be a real handful though. They are not for new shooters. Desert Eagles, S&W Model 29s, and certain Ruger Blackhawks are legendary firearms in the shooting world, as well as pop culture. Movies like The Matrix, the Dirty Harry series, and Wind River have placed big-bore revolvers and hand cannons into the American psyche. Dirty Harry and his .44 Magnum While they are both fun and cool, they are not good for beginners. The massive recoil is not beginner-friendly, and at best, it will make you develop a flinch, and at worst, it will smack you right in the face. Actually, at worst, if you don’t know what you are doing, and you accidentally shoot yourself. This happened with a young lady firing an S&W 500 revolver. She fired the gun and in twisted in her hands resulting in her pulling the trigger as the weapon was pointed at her own head. Kind of like this, but she held her grip instead of it rolling out. I would never place a magnum caliber handgun in the hands of a beginner. It’s insanely dangerous and foolish. Outside of the danger level, the ammunition for these weapons is expensive, and that will dissuade many from the shooting necessary to establish proper shooting habits. Speaking of ammo, when you get magnum calibers, you get a lot of specialty loads that you’ll need to be able to read and understand before you toss in your gun. Popular Pistol Calibers, 10mm and .357 Magnum are two examples of magnum calibers A box of Winchester .44 Magnum ammunition is going to be a lot different than a box of Buffalo Bore .44 Magnum. And that’s before we get into the .500 family! Cartridge lineup, left to right: 9mm, .50 Beowulf, and .500 Linebaugh. If you don’t understand bullet weights and velocities, then you are gonna have a bad time. That Buffalo Bore or Double Tap is going to kick your ass. Black Hills 240gr .44 Magnum 50 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 50 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Magnum caliber handguns are for experienced shooters, and beginners should only use one under the supervision of an experienced shooter. Caveat If you are a new shooter and looking at a powerful revolver, there is one magnum caliber I’d say is okay for new shooters. That is the .357 Magnum. Cimarron Frontier and Pietta 1873 , both in .357 Magnum! It’s magnum light in many ways, especially compared to modern magnums. That being said, get a full or mid-sized revolver, or even a Desert Eagle in this caliber. The Smith & Wesson 686+ is an awesome full-sized .357 Magnum revolver, even for new shooters Avoid snub nose revolvers in .357 Magnum. A .357 Magnum does allow you to shoot .38 Specials, which are much softer recoil wise and cheaper for training purposes. 12 Gauge Shotguns/Firearms I love shotguns. Love them an absolute ton. They are amazing weapons. They ain’t for new shooters though. Twelve gauge shotguns and firearms have hefty recoil, a limited capacity, and expensive ammunition. When I say firearms as a new gun owner, you might be confused, all guns are firearms, but at the same time, some firearms are different. Guns that look and operate like shotguns, but lack a stock and often have 14-inch barrels, but an overall length of 26 inches is technically a firearm. Mossberg 590M Shockwave “firearm”. Like magnum handguns, a firearm can be a dangerous weapon that jumps and kicks from your hands like a trout trying to free itself. On top of that, these guns can easily give you a kick to the face if you aim them without being ready for the punch the gun is about to throw. For those who know nothing about guns, especially twelve gauges, you’ll quickly find out the benefit of training and experience. Even a shotgun with a stock can be uncomfortable. I like to think I am a journeyman shotgunner, and I’m pretty good at recoil reduction, but a day with a shotgun will still leave me with a beat-up shoulder. Just some of the shells after a day of shooting my Tavor TS12 An amateur is going to develop a flinch quite quickly. The most common type of shotgun is a pump-action, and if it’s for defensive use, you have to get real good at working that pump if you don’t you are bound to short stroke the gun and give yourself a nice jam to work your way through. If you get a semi-automatic, you are going to have to learn how to feed it the right ammo, and how to keep it clean. Semi-auto shotguns are finicky and require the right ammo and a good level of maintenance. If you’re looking for your first pump-action shotgun, we can help! A single shot or double barrel is going to be lightweight, and that will just increase your felt recoil. Start out with a 20 Gauge. A 20 gauge is a powerful weapon with a lot less recoil than any 12 gauge. Caveat If you are looking for a bird hunting or skeet/trap gun, a 12 gauge shotgun might be the right ticket. The only reason why is the use of soft shooting sporting loads designed for super small game and busting clay pigeons. Remington #9 2-3/4" Bird Shot 8 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 8 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Recoil will still be a jolt, but it won’t be near as punishing, although a 20 gauge can still be a good bird gun and a more challenging skeet or trap gun. Micro 9mm/.380s Small, pocket-sized carry guns are everywhere. They are an attractive weapon for concealed carriers, especially if you are new to carrying and shooting. Micro compact guns like this Ruger LCP II are easy to conceal, but not fun to shoot. There seems to be a mindset among a lot of new shooters, and first-time shoppers that smaller guns are a better choice for new shooters. People think the smaller the gun is, the easier it is to handle. This is, unfortunately, not true. Pocket-sized .380s and even worse 9mms are a handful. They slap your hand like a hard high five and try to work their way out of your hands with every shot. This Bersa Firestorm is one of our editor’s EDC CCW, careful though — recoil is snappy! They aren’t pleasant to shoot, which means training will be less of a priority compared to not beating up your hand daily. Also, they often lack proper sights, and the tiny grip makes reloads a hassle. This sucks cause you likely only get 6 to 7 rounds at most, and you can barely aim, much less reload under stress. These guns also tend to be picking towards limp wristing. Limp wristing is not holding a firm enough wrist while shooting. This can cause some serious reliability issues and give you some fun jams. Caveat I don’t really have one. Don’t go anything smaller than a Glock 43 or 42. My personal favorite is the P365 from SIG Sauer. My personal Sig Sauer P365 and a SGI Taco magazine holder Subcompact .40 S&Ws If you are a new shooter just learning the ropes, a .40 S&W can be an inviting weapon. They are common, and a lot of people feel .40 S&W is a good compromise between 9mm and 45 ACP. Glock G27 sub-compact .40 Smith & Wesson If you are a new shooter and you want a gun you can carry, a subcompact .40 might look even better. By subcompact, I mean Glock 27 sized firearms, not Glock 23 size. These subcompact frames in .40 S&W can be rough shooters. Recoil and snap will be at an all-time high. The gun will try to wrestle it’s way out of your hands and give you a nice dose of slide bite with every other round. If you are a new shooter learning the ropes of a handgun, a subcompact .40 will be an unpleasant experience. .40 S&W Round Not only that, but the ammo is more expensive than 9mm, and the round is falling out of favor. It may be around for the rest of my life, but we won’t see a lot of development for the round between then and now. Caveat .40 S&W Law Enforcement trade-ins are selling for close to nothing. You can get a Glock, an S&W M&P, or any number of polymer-frame striker-fired pistols that are of extremely high quality. Used .40 S&W Handguns 430 at Guns.com Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 430 at Guns.com Prices accurate at time of writing If you see one at a great price and you can afford it over a lower tier handgun, go for it. But shoot it a lot, and get some training with it. Anything In the Ring of Fire Family The Ring of Fire guns are small, super cheap guns from companies like Lorcin, Raven, Bryco, Jennings, and Phoenix. These companies are mostly dead, but lots of their guns are still floating around. A Bryco Arms .380 such as this has resulted in more than 1 accidental death due to their defective design, Guns.com These cheap pot metal guns are small, available in a variety of calibers. Their main appeal is their often sub 100 dollar price tags. The downsides are, well it’s easier just to bullet point this: Unreliable Poor fit and finish Unreliable Magazines suck Heavy recoil due to blowback design Unreliable Sloppy construction Terrible triggers Did I mention these are unreliable? They’ll jam, misfeed, fail to fire, and all that, but they will also crack and fall apart. Literally everyone that owns a gun from the Ring of Fire family. Caveat None just stay away from them like the guy who hands out apples on Halloween. Great Guns for Beginners I won’t leave you guys with just bad guns. Here are a few good choices for your first gun. Ruger 10/22 It’s a classic rifle, one of the most mass-produced in history. It’s reliable, accurate, and cheap! Ruger 10/22 250 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 250 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing You can find a Ruger 10/22 in almost any gun shop across the country. Everyone should have a Ruger 10/22 rifle and it’s a gun that has staying power. You can upgrade it, customize it, and make it yours. Fully Upgraded 10/22 Heritage Arms .22 LR Revolver As far as first-time handguns go, this is the best one to start with. Several models are under 150 bucks, and it’s a single-action design that harkens back to the days of cowboys and western life. Classicly Awesome Heritage Rough Rider Revolvers 140 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 140 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The Heritage Arms .22 LR Revolver is a fun, accurate, and reliable revolver. It’s single-action design also forces new shooters to slow down and take their time between shots. It’s also an easy shooting gun that’s not too big on maintenance. Ruger Wrangler .22 LR If you’re interested in spending a touch more to get an even better beginner .22lr revolver, take a look at the Ruger Wrangler! A pair of Ruger Wranglers These are normally in the $175-200 range and offer a major improvement in quality and durability over the Rough Riders. We highly recommend them, so take a look at the full review ! Ruger Wrangler 200 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 200 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Full-sized/Compact 9mm pistols If you can’t spend the money on several guns and can only have one, then a full-sized or compact 9mm is a good choice. CZ 75 SP-01 is a full-size 9mm that is a dream to shoot! Compact in the gun world doesn’t mean pocket pistol, it means SIG P229, Glock 19, CZ P-10C and other assorted somewhat large firearms. The CZ P10C OR is an optics-ready compact 9mm designed for EDC. The above are all excellent choices, as are the SIG P226, the CZ 75B, and the Glock 17. Handguns are tough to shoot, but these guns are quite user friendly and offer you a soft shooting, easy to control gun that’s cheap to train with. It’s also a capable self-defense firearm. Check out more of our favorites in Best Handguns for Beginners . Beginner’s Guide to Guns AR-15 Carbines AR-15s are awesome weapons for plinking, home defense, shooting sports, and even hunting. BCM with Magpul 40-Rounder They are also very simple to use. Every year thousands of 18-year-olds with zero firearms experience qualify on the M4/M16 platform in boot camps around the country. The AR-15 series are similar to the M4/M16 in terms of controls, accuracy, and general layout. Learning to use one is very simple, and with a little instruction, any new gun owner can learn how to use one effectively. The AR-15 can be adapted in size for any adult shooter and the ammo, magazines, and parts are widely available and affordable. Check out our favorites in our AR-15 Buyer’s Guide . A few of our favorite things… Pistol Caliber Carbines A pistol caliber carbine is a rifle that shoots pistol rounds. They come in a wide variety of designs and are quite popular these days. You can find them at any price point with several different magazine platforms. New Frontier Armory C-9 These guns can be quite affordable, and the ammo to feed is as well. They are soft shooting, and best of all, most indoor ranges that ban rifles will allow PCCs. This allows you to train and get sharp and stay sharp. If you want a suggestion for which one, my vote is for the Ruger PC Carbine. Ruger PCC is a great place to start your pistol caliber carbine obsession! It’s affordable, simple to use, and allows you to use Glock magazines, which are both cheap and plentiful. Glock 19X, 45 9mm 17-Round Factory Magazine 25 at GunMag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 25 at GunMag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing Check out more in our Best PCCs article. Parting Shots These are what I think are terrible guns for new shooters. With so many people buying their first gun right now, I feel it’s responsible to offer not only advice on good guns, but advice on which guns to avoid as well. In time as new shooters become more experienced, they may find that some of these guns might be right for them. Until then, stick to guns that are well made, won’t beat you up, and are more practical for new shooters. What do you folks think? What’s the gun you’d advise new shooters avoid? Let us know in the comments! For a LOT more information, take a look at the Beginner’s Guide To Guns and also our hands-on video course… Gun Noob to Gun Slinger ! Gun Noob Course Screencap

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